HOW TO SEW A MASK

Nhi Nguyen, Feature Section Editor

Almost a year later, the world is still suffering in the throes of COVID-19. Even with reports of the vaccine coming out, cases are still rising, the numbers increasing daily. During these times, states are mandating mask-wearing policies in public areas to help reduce the rate of infection.
If you are in need of a mask, there are plenty of styles and patterns you could just buy, but why not save money and save that mask for someone who really needs it?
Here is how to sew your own mask.

You will need:
At least 24 inches of cloth, preferably cotton.
10 inches of elastic/ 2 rubber bands/ strings of an old disposable mask
Either a sewing machine or thread and a needle.

First, find a pattern online. I have included the pattern that I used to sew masks for my family when the pandemic first started and masks were mandated in public areas.
During these instructions, I will refer to the front side of the fabric as either the ‘front’ or the ‘pretty’ side. This is the side that you want facing out; the side of the fabric that people will see.

Instructions:
Cut out the pattern.
Fold your fabric in half.
Trace the pattern twice onto the fabric and cut them out. You should now have four pieces of cloth.
Sew two pieces of the fabric together, front sides facing each other.
*Optional: iron the creases of the mask after every line you sew. This will make your sewing neater and the mask will look better.
Do the same for the last two. Remember to sew them front sides together!
Take the two pieces that you have and sew the long sides together
Now you should have an ‘inside out’ mask with two holes at the sides.
Flip the fabric inside out
At the sides, flip the pretty sides in so that there are no frayed edges.
Sew the strings into the two sides. If needed, pin the strings and sides to make the sewing easier.
*Optional: iron the mask again for a brand-new look!

Warning: Make sure to ask your parents before utilizing a sewing machine or a needle. You CAN get hurt- the needles on the sewing machine are sharp, and you CAN poke yourself working with a needle.