The student news site of iUniversity Prep in Grapevine, Texas

iHoot

  • Happy Fall! Time to read some amazing articles! 🍂
  • Look at all the amazing articles written by our awesome writers! 😍
  • Welcome back, iHooters! Join us in Mrs. Harbison's LL Room on Fridays at 9:30
The student news site of iUniversity Prep in Grapevine, Texas

iHoot

The student news site of iUniversity Prep in Grapevine, Texas

iHoot

THE MEANING OF HALLOWEEN

Halloween and its impact on students at iUniversity Prep
THE+MEANING+OF+HALLOWEEN
Stephanie Sangrey

As the days that were once full of Texas heat come to an end, that can only mean one thing: spooky season has arrived! 

Pumpkin spice flavor is everywhere, the leaves are changing colors, and we start to sense that eerie feeling that fills the air this time of the year. 

 

We are all well aware of the holiday that occurs where people decorate their homes with cobwebs, skeletons, and pumpkins. Children begin to plan their costumes, and everyone stocks up on an array of various sweets for the trick-or-treaters that will come knocking on the night of October 31st. 

So, where did this annual fright night come from? 

 

The idea originally came from the Celtic culture as a way to welcome the darker days that were coming in the autumn months. They would hold a harvest called the “Samhain” which would include the lighting of bonfires and dressing up in various costumes. The Celtics believed this annual practice would aid in warding off any spirits that would attempt to enter the mortal world during the Pagan new year, which occurred on November 1st (Library of Congress). 

 

During the mid 1800s and early 1900s, this religious practice began gaining popularity due to the Irish immigration into America. By 1940, just about everybody was taking part in the trick-or-treating, causing one of the largest spikes in candy sales in America. In 1942, the popularity of this holiday became so intense that many areas had “canceled” the holiday due to a drought in resources for the traditions. Many cities became worried about the parades and large gatherings that would occur and viewed it as a hazard (America in WWII).

 

Nowadays, Halloween has become a staple tradition during the fall months. Many people have their own family traditions for this spooky holiday. Dressing up with friends, going to haunted houses, and hosting parties have all become various ways people celebrate this annual occasion. 

 

How do iUP Owls celebrate Halloween?

 

Ani Burton, a senior here at iUP, says that the “celebration of Halloween has changed throughout the years for me. From the age of four up until twelve, I would enjoy hours worth traveling in the bitter cold, around all neighborhoods, and trick-or-treating with close friends and family. I would usually come back home with a bag of overflowing candy.” However, this tradition changed as she got older, and she noted that “when I hit my teenage years, I would stay home, eat the store-bought candy meant for the other trick-or-treaters, and get snug on my couch to watch my Hocus Pocus.” 

 

“I love dressing up for Halloween and going trick-or-treating! It’s always so fun to see everyone’s cool costumes and spooky decorations!” Anika Goswami in 8th grade adds about her favorite moments during Halloween. 

 

Phoebe has a special connection with Halloween, she says that “Halloween to me is very special, not only do we get to dress up, but it is my mom’s birthday! This makes Halloween more special than anyone else thinks Halloween is. We usually go trick or treating as a family and then go eat for my mom’s birthday! Last year we celebrated it at Disney! This is where she wanted to go so this is even more fun to do for her birthday!”

 

“Halloween is where all of your friends and family can go and hang out together, also it is that you get free candy and you have to wear a costume to get it, it is a win-win!” 8th grader, Kshetra Jinukala says. 6’th grader Kaylee Dowdy agrees, adding that, “To me halloween means to dress up and hangout with your friends and run around the neighborhood and ask for candy. Every year my neighborhood has a party and me and my friends go super fast so we can go around a second time.”

 

“Halloween (also known as ‘All Hallow’s Eve’, over time it got shortened) means that you can embrace your dressing-up side and get creative with your costumes. It is also a time where parents can’t say no to eating candy! Halloween is mostly a time to celebrate scary arts. Halloween is one of my favorite holidays, because I like being really creative with my designs and have fun looking at different ways people dress up their house!” says Valentina Carmona, a 6th grader here at iUP. Kariana Karhu, 6th grader, has a similar opinion, saying that, “Halloween is a time to appreciate cosplayers, spooky season, and candy! It’s all around a fun time seeing everyone come up to your door and say ‘Trick or Treat!’ or how their faces light up when you hand them a full size Snickers.”

 

And finally, 9’th grader Kai Jimenes adds that, “For me Halloween it’s a time of celebration and having fun. It’s distant from the norm of everyday life and it’s a break from reality”.

 

If you celebrate Halloween, you know that everybody has their own unique way of enjoying this tradition. However you choose to recognize Halloween, whether it is a thriller approach with haunted houses and horror movies, or a cozier side with baking and watching your favorite fall movies, we all can appreciate the signaling of change that comes with this time. There is definitely a certain tone to the season with the drastic weather changes and the many holidays that occur each month as the year comes to a close. 

 

Sources

 

Thomas, Heather (2021, October 26) The Origins of Halloween Traditions, Date Accessed, September 25, 2023

https://blogs.loc.gov/headlinesandheroes/2021/10/the-origins-of-halloween-traditions/#:~:text=Yet%2C%20the%20Halloween%20holiday%20has,costumes%20to%20ward%20off%20ghosts.

 

Editors, History.com, (2018, April 6), Samhain,  Date Accessed, September 25, 2023

https://www.history.com/topics/holidays/samhain

 

Editors, History.com, (2023, August 11) Halloween 2023, Date accessed, October 12, 2023

https://www.history.com/topics/halloween/history-of-halloween

 

Zebrowski, Carl (2018) A Wartime Halloween, Date Accessed October 10 2023

http://www.americainwwii.com/articles/a-wartime-halloween/#:~:text=Lack%20of%20resources%20wasn%27t,and%20grease%20for%20the%20war%E2%80%A6.

 

Leave a Comment
More to Discover
About the Contributor
Stephanie Sangrey, Staff Writer
Hi! My name is Stephanie and I am a senior of iUP! This is my first year at iUPrep, which also happens to be my last! Reading, writing, music, and photography are some of my favorite hobbies outside of schoolwork. I am thrilled to be one of the Staff Writers within the newsletter and cannot wait to contribute!

Comments (0)

iHoot intends for this area to be used to foster healthy, thought-provoking discussion. Comments are expected to adhere to our community agreements and to be respectful and constructive. As such, we do not permit the use of profanity, foul language, personal attacks, or the use of language that might be interpreted as libelous. Comments are reviewed and must be approved by a moderator to ensure that they meet these standards. iHoot does not allow anonymous comments, and iHoot requires a valid email address. The email address will not be displayed but will be used to confirm your comments.
All iHoot Picks Reader Picks Sort: Newest

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *